green1

ELECTRIC, POWER & RENEWABLE EN...

Indonesia has emerged as a rapid growing Asian economic powerhouse, and its international pro?le continues to grow with its participation in the G-20 ...

green2

U.S. lags Europe, Indonesia in prod...

The United States has tripled its production of clean energy in the past decade, but it still lags far behind Europe and Indonesia and is only slightl...

green4

Indonesia Stands Out in Clean Energ...

Indonesia beat G-20 nations the United States, India, and Japan in the rate of growth in clean energy investment last year, according to a new report ...

green3

Investors line up for piece of Indo...

To help Indonesia get enough power to feed its booming economy, investors are lining up to invest billions of dollars in the country's growing green p...

ELECTRIC, POWER & RENEWABLE ENERGY INDONESIA 2013

green1Indonesia has emerged as a rapid growing Asian economic powerhouse, and its international pro?le continues to grow with its participation in the G-20 and other international economic forums. Indonesia’s growing leadership role in the global economy forms a strong ground for building and expanding international trade and investment ties. To allow for that Indonesia has freed up most of its international investment laws to encourage direct foreign investment.

The amount of money allocated to develop infrastructure in Indonesia is vast, and is estimated to reach US$194.7bn with US$73.3bn of that speci?cally allocated to developing power and energy infrastructure (G20).

With the government implementing 11 key reforms to boost foreign investment and promote growth through streamlining the process of starting a business in Indonesia, foreign direct investment (FDI) is predicted to reach US$22.5 billion in 2013

From 04 Sep, 2013
To 07 Sep, 2013
Venue Jakarta International Expo Kemayoran

One Event – 3 Key Shows

 


Power Indonesia
The country’s rapid economic growth has resulted in power demand in the country increasing by 7% each year . Even higher demand is anticipated in the future with an annual growth rate of 9.2 % expected to continue until 2019.
Indonesia alone holds 40% of the world’s total geothermal reserves, however currently only less than 4% is being developed, leaving the sector wide open for growth.


Renewable Energy
Renewable Energy Indonesia 2013Rising coal and oil prices and the commitment to green technology are driving the government’s national energy policy to increase the use of natural gas and renewable energy recourses. With 55% of new production being slated towards renewable power generation, total private sector investments by IPPs are expected to reach US$ 11.11billion by 2014.

The government of Indonesia is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 26% by 2020. In addition the Clean Technology Fund (CTF) Investment Plan for Indonesia proposes co-?nancing of US$400 M to support Indonesia’s goals of providing 17% of total energy use from renewable energy by 2025.

 


Electric Indonesia
The Indonesian government is projecting electricity demand to increase by 9.5% annually for the next five years. A substantial portion of the growing demand will come from continued electrification as traditional wood, charcoal and kerosene energy sources are replaced by electricity. National electrification rates are projected to hit 93% by 2025.

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U.S. lags Europe, Indonesia in producing clean energy

green2The United States has tripled its production of clean energy in the past decade, but it still lags far behind Europe and Indonesia and is only slightly ahead of Mexico and India in the share of electricity it gets from renewable sources, a report Monday says.

About 2.7% of U.S. electricity came from wind, solar, geothermal and other renewable sources last year, up from 0.66% in 2002, according to the scorecard by the Natural Resources Defense Council , an environmental group advocating for more renewable energy.

Germany got four times as much — or 10.7% — of its power from these sources last year, followed by Italy (6.2%), Indonesia (5.7%), United Kingdom (4.2%) and Argentina (2.8%.) Mexico and India came in right behind the U.S. with 2.6% and 2.4%, respectively.

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Indonesia Stands Out in Clean Energy Rise

green4Indonesia beat G-20 nations the United States, India, and Japan in the rate of growth in clean energy investment last year, according to a new report from Pew Charitable Trusts.

After passing the $1 billion mark in clean energy investment in 2010, Indonesia recorded a whopping 520 percent growth in investment gains last year. It ranks 14th overall.

“The country has an estimated 40 percent of the world’s known geothermal energy resources, and 2011 investments were guided toward developing this natural source of heat,” said the report, which was released on Wednesday.

Titled “Who’s Winning the Clean Energy Race? 2011 Edition,” the report examines key financial, investment and technological trends in 2011 related to the clean energy economies of G-20 members, with the primary focus being investment.

Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a market research firm focused on renewable energy, was Pew’s research partner in compiling and reviewing the data.

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Investors line up for piece of Indonesia’s green energy action

To help Indonesia get enough power to feed its booming economy, investors are lining up to invest billions of dollars in the country’s growing green power sector, lured by government moves to ease regulations and speed investment in power projects, according to a report in Reuters.

Around a third of Indonesia’s 240 million people are currently without power supply, and projections are for generation capacity to nearly triple by 2020 to meet a severe power shortage.

Rising investment in green power – geothermal, hydro, biomass and solar – projects as well as coal and gas is part of a surge in foreign direct investment, up 21 percent on the year in the second quarter of 2011.

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Indonesia’s electricity production is among the most expensive in the world because of the high proportion that comes from oil-fired generation, which exposes the government to price spikes in the oil market. Fuel oil costs the utility company, PT PLN, about USD12 kWh but it receives about USD6 kWh in subsidies to shield consumers from the costly fuel source.

This subsidy equates to roughly USD5 billion per year and is a major drain on tax revenues that would otherwise be spent on education, health, housing, law and order, and transportation infrastructure. Many critics argue this is simply is not sustainable.

To address the supply shortage and shift to a more optimal energy mix, the government of Indonesia has launched a 10 GW “fast track” program of building coal-fired plants. Even though it will add roughly 60 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually, these new plants are imperative for reducing the electricity subsidy and sustaining the country’s economic growth. However it is as yet unclear how much this will reduce the average cost of electricity and the huge annual electric subsidy.

The nation’s electricity sector has long suffered from a lack of capital investment due to heavy regulation and monopoly. Without renewed capital investment PLN will continue to suffer from extremely poor peak load management, inadequate maintenance systems and overloaded transmission lines, all of which work together to give us brownouts and blackouts.

Indonesia is rich in energy resources and is trying to craft a smart power strategy to harness these to sustain its electricity supply, support rapid economic growth and take care of the environment. It can make a strong case that a little financial compensation can deliver big results for geothermal power and the international drive for clean energy. It seems that international investors are taking note of the opportunity.

Two years ago, Mochamad Sofyan, head of the New and Renewable Energy Division at PLN, says he received just two visits a month. Now, investors from the United States, Japan, Europe, South Korea and China line up for an appointment, he says. “If I had enough time, I would be meeting investors every day,” he said in a recent Reuters interview.

The challenge is vast. As of 2010, Indonesia’s generation capacity was 30,000 MW. For neighbouring Australia, with a tenth of the population, it is 51,000 MW. At present, about 12 percent of Indonesia’s total energy mix comes from geothermal and hydro. By 2019, that is projected to grow to 18 percent, PLN says. Coal will remain as the top energy source, rising to about 60 percent of the energy mix by 2019 from less than 50 percent now.

Two fast-track power programs, each totalling 10,000 MW, have helped propel investment because of a government guarantee that PLN, the top power producer and sole distributor, will buy the electricity.

The second and latest program focuses on green power, with about half of the capacity set to come from renewables. Other investments are going ahead outside the program as well.

Sofyan said he expected an additional 6,000 MW from new geothermal projects by 2019 and another 6,100 MW from large and small hydro plants. Currently, about 1,200 MW comes from geothermal plants and 4,000 MW from large hydro.

Via: CleanBiz